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Goat Logic

Goat Logic

I'm in Waco, Texas this week facilitating the Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® training program. And man, is it hot! Been in the upper 90s for the entire week. It's so hot here that my flip-flops melt on the pavement every time I take a step. Thus my walking progress is rather slow and my carbon footprint is rather obvious. Nevertheless, it has been a great week.

 

Our participants are educators from the school districts in the surrounding area. They are dedicated professionals who know the value of the training. They have asked intelligent questions, worked hard, and they've been outstanding participants overall. They have also taught me a few things, especially about Texas culture.

 

For example, we were talking about being careful about advertising their buttons. Buttons being the things we are most sensitive about that others may "push." I had one participant who agreed and said, "Students can't be in the barn . . . if the goat is loose." Or something to that effect.

 

Button pushing is what we all fall prey to if we are not careful. Its result is a negative emotional response we sometimes reveal when someone gets our goat . . . if the owner's barn is on fire. So remember to buy fire insurance . . . if you own goats. In fact, I think there's a Texas state law about goat insurance, if I'm not mistaken. Goats are definitely high maintenance. So are barns for that matter. I've never owned goats, but if I did, I would put them in a barn and buy fire insurance just in case. I don't know if I would tie them up, however. After all, who am I to restrict their movement?

 

Actually, I don't even like goats. When I was a kid, (baby goat reference) my parents took me to a petting zoo. A goat began to eat the corner of the jacket I was wearing. My mother pulled me away before that goat ate my entire jacket. The horror, the horror.

 

So, in conclusion, if you are in Texas you should probably avoid goats. They eat anything. They can also set your barn on fire if you're not careful. Some of them are smokers after all. You should also avoid letting students and others push your buttons. After all, they can't get your goat if they don't know where you tied it up. Ka-ching! Thanks Nancy and everyone at Region XII!

You are now goaded to go get helpful hints about behavior management. 

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