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3 Videos to Help You Provide Distinguished Dementia Care

By Erin Harris | Posted on 11.02.2012 | 0 comments
3 Videos to Help You Provide Distinguished Dementia Care
Photo: Paul / Thinkstock
Are you looking for ways to help persons with dementia feel joy and experience quality of life? Do you need tips for helping a family member cope with the effects of her loved one’s disease?

Kim Warchol, OTR/L, president and founder of Dementia Care Specialists, has been vlogging about a variety of ways in which health care professionals can provide individuals with dementia, as well as their families, with the support they need.

In a recent video, Kim discusses habilitation, a practice in which you work with the remaining abilities of a person with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, focusing on what he can do, rather than on what he can’t do. With this abilities-based focus at the heart of your practice, you can equip a person with the means to be as happy, safe, and functional as possible, and you can help the family of a person with dementia to cope and to thrive from day to day as well. Watch the video here.

In light of recent World Health Organization (WHO) statistics that predict that two billion people worldwide will have dementia by the year 2050, Kim calls for action in another video and asks that nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and other care professionals demand the training that is essential to ensuring that people with dementia are enabled to live lives of quality at every stage of the disease. Check out the video here.

And Kim presents exciting news in another video in which she discusses the federal class action lawsuit that challenged the Medicare Improvement Standard. The lawsuit resulted in the ruling that Medicare will pay for occupational, physical, and speech therapy services that maintain the current condition of a person with Alzheimer’s disease, or that prevent or slow further deterioration. This means a lot for therapists and their clients, as it enables persons with dementia to receive the habilitative care that is so necessary to happiness and safety for themselves as well as their care providers and loved ones.

Learn about Dementia Care Specialists training for care partners and therapists, and check out “Lawsuit Won! Therapy Reimbursement Claims for Dementia Patients Honored” right here:


Get more resources to help you provide high-quality dementia care.
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