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The Latest PBIS Legislative Activity

By Susan Keith | Posted on 11.22.2010 | 2 comments

This edition of the PBIS Post is designed to raise awareness about current federal legislative activity and national initiatives relating to Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). 

 

In her session at the March 2010 Association for Positive Behavior Support (APBS) Conference, Laurel Stine, director of federal relations at the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law in Washington D.C., shared some details about H.R.2597, the Positive Behavior for Safe and Effective Schools Act. This bill would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to create avenues for schools to more easily implement school-wide PBIS (SW-PBIS) with use of grants and Title I funds, and to train teachers on how to improve school climates. 

 

Stine also spoke on H.R.4247 and S.2860, now known as the Keeping All Students Safe Act. Stine discussed how the bill, among other things, would provide competitive grants to assist with the development and implementation of the state plan, training, and implementation of PBIS to further prevent restraint and seclusion. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) would identify models that emphasize PBIS and de-escalation techniques over physical intervention.

 

Unfortunately, this bill stalled in the Senate this spring. The good news is that it was re-introduced in the Senate in October under the same name, but with a new number, S.3895.

 

Stine also talked about H.R.2531, the Mental Health in Schools Act, which encourages the implementation of PBIS within schools, as well as H.R.4122, the Graduation for All Act, which speaks to how successful implementation of SW-PBIS can lead to academic improvement and comprehensively address the social and emotional development of students.

 

CPI actively monitors this type of legislative activity on an ongoing basis. Watch the CPI website and Instructor Forum for updates, and view our recent webinar on the Keeping All Students Safe Act.

 

You may also track progress of this legislation on the GovTrack or Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law websites.

 

As you can see, it's an important time to put on your advocacy hat and correspond with your elected officials. Share in the Comments section what's going on with PBIS regulations and/or legislation locally or in your country, or use the information above to start doing some research about where things are headed for the future!

 

Read more about PBIS on our Knowledge Base page.

 

Download our free Resource Guide, Top 10 Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports PBIS Online Resources.

 

Already an Instructor or Site Member? Log in to access your free resource.

 

 
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Comments
marian banes
I too am concerned for bus drivers and assistants. This group needs to have some focus on them as well.
11/30/2010 2:05:02 PM
Charlene Majors
I hope that the funding or grants for this training could also be made available to customize a similar training program that is suitable for bus drivers and attendants on buses. I wish school systems (education side of the house) with qualified training staff would offer this training when given grants / funding to support staff as well. It is much harder operating a vehicle that weighs 13 tons traveling at 40 mph and dealing with these situations than it is to be in a stable environment and facing the students. What avenues are available for funding for transportation departments?
11/23/2010 2:12:39 PM
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