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12 Awesome Books About Autism and Asperger’s

By Susan Keith | Posted on 01.28.2013 | 2 comments
12 Awesome Books About Autism and Asperger’s

Greetings and happy 2013! At the end of last year, our ASD and PBIS training teams met to brainstorm about what topics you might like us to share information about this year.

If you have attended our advanced course, Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applications of Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® Training, you’ll remember that in each program we create a Wall of Wisdom. We post a piece of flip-chart paper on the wall and record resources that program participants share.

Over the years, we’ve collected a list of quite a few great tools, and we’ve added a number of our own as well. And we’ve organized many of these resources into categories that we want to share with you throughout 2013. Categories include: Books (shared below), General Autism/PBIS Information, Professional Resources, Sensory Resources, Visual Support, and Technology.

We encourage you to comment on the resources we discuss and to add your own. Share the wealth! If you’re a CPI Certified Instructor, head over to the Community to discuss resources and how-to ideas. Join our Awesome ASD Resources thread or start your own! If you’re not yet part of the CPI family, please feel free to tell us in the Comments section below what resources you find positive and engaging.

Awesome Books About Autism and Asperger’s

  1. Asperger’s: What Does It Mean To Me?: Structured Teaching Ideas for Home and School by Katherine Faherty and Gary Mesibov (2000)
  2. The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome by Tony Attwood (Jessica Kingsley; 2008)
  3. Difficult Behavior in Early Childhood by Ronald Mah (Corwin Press; 2006)
  4. From Disability to Possibility: The Power of Inclusive Classrooms [PDF] by Patrick Schwarz (Heinemann; 2006) Download a PDF preview of this book.
  5. Functional Assessment and Program Development for Problem Behavior: A Practical Handbook by O’Neill et al
  6. Functional Behavioral Assessment: A Systematic Process for Assessment and Intervention in General and Special Education Classroom by Mary McConnell (Love Publishing Company of Denver; 2000)
  7. The Handbook of High-Risk Challenging Behaviors in People with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities edited by James K. Luiselli (Brooks Publishing; 2011)
  8. How Do I Teach This Kid? By Kimberly A. Henry (Future Horizons; 2005)
  9. Making Lemonade: Hints for Autism’s Helpers by Judy Endow (Cambridge Book Review Press; 2006)
  10. Movement Differences and Diversity in Autism/Mental Retardation: Appreciating and Accommodating People With Communication and Behavioral Challenges by Anne Donnellan and Martha Leary (the “Movin’ On” series from DRI Press; 2006)
  11. Right From the Start: Behavioral Intervention for Young Children With Autism, Second Edition by Sandra Harris and Mary Jane Weiss (Woodbine House; 2007)
  12. Walk Awhile in My Autism by Kate McGinnity and Nan Negri (Cambridge Book Review Press; 2005)


Check out CPI’s ASD Resources.

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”
Alan Kay

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Comments
Bob Wake
Thank you so much for including on your list two of our Cambridge Book Review Press titles ("Making Lemonade" by Judy Endow, and "Walk Awhile in My Autism" by Kate McGinnity and Nan Negri). Wanted to let you know that one of the other titles on your list, "Movement Differences and Diversity in Autism/Mental Retardation" by Anne Donnellan and Martha Leary, was acquired by Cambridge Book Review Press in 2012 and reprinted in a significantly revised and expanded edition as "Autism: Sensory-Movement Differences and Diversity." The earlier edition is no longer in print.
5/24/2013 1:25:25 AM
Susan
You forgot The Asperger's Answer Book: Professional Answers to the Top 275 Questions Parents Ask.
2/3/2013 3:03:59 PM
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