Mississippi's Student Safety Act

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Update: This bill failed to get committee action and died in committee on March 12, 2014. Keep an eye on our News blog, as we will post updates if this bill is reintroduced or a similar bill is introduced. 

The Mississippi Student Safety Act, which aims to reduce and prevent the use of certain restraint and seclusion procedures in public and state-funded private schools in Mississippi, has passed in the state’s Senate and House.
 
Also known as Mississippi Senate Bill 2594, the act is intended to ensure that school staff have the skills to handle disruptive and violent student behavior in a manner that’s as safe as possible for both students and staff. It calls for seclusion and restraint to be used only as a last resort when a student presents an immediate danger of physical harm to self or others. It also requires physical restraint to be used only by staff who have been trained in a state-approved crisis intervention training program.
 
Once adopted, MS SB2594 will require the Mississippi State Board of Education, within 180 days, to publicize regulations establishing minimum standards for the use of restraint and seclusion in Mississippi schools.
 
We will continue to monitor the progress of the Mississippi Student Safety Act and post updates detailing its passage into law.
 
Read the bill.

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“Every individual on this earth deserves to be treated with compassion, understanding, and the right to keep their dignity intact. This can be difficult to honor at times when someone loses control of their behavior, but that’s where Rational Detachment and not taking it personally really kicks in. What has helped me be able to do this well goes back to the first day I was introduced to Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® training. I was a participant before becoming a Certified Instructor (and before working for CPI), and over the years I have had so many opportunities to use what I learned way back then. Today, I live the skills automatically. It’s an honor to have been given those skills to live the philosophy of treating others the way I want to be treated.”

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